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Partners for a Healthier Community, Inc. was invited by Pam Wildnauer, Program Director of the Citizens for Citizens (CFC) Head Start Program, to provide a staff workshop on February 22, 2017 on healthy snacks for preschoolers. 

Partners Steering Committee Secretary and United Neighbors of Fall River, Executive Director Wendy Garf-Lipp, Partners' School Wellness Coordinator Marcia Picard, and Partners Executive Director Dr. David Weed presented the hour-long session to help Head Start teachers make better choices for snacks served in school. Unlike lunch and breakfast served to children, the government does not prescribe the contents of snacks, so it's important that staff make good choices. Wendy began the session by asking groups of teachers their ideas of what constitutes the components of a healthy snack. She then challenged them to rate a series of common snack items and to suggest which ones meet those criteria. Much of the emphasis of the session was on the sugar content of many snack items, especially those that are advertised as lower in fat. Dr. Weed concluded the session by stressing the importance of dietary fats in supplying essential vitamins A,D,E and K, including the healthy fat in whole milk. Click here for a 53-minute video of the presentation. For more information, contact Dr. Weed at 508-837-9029. .

(Top row) Program Director of the Citizens for Citizens (CFC) Head Start Program Pam Wildnauer introduces United Neighbors of Fall River, Executive Director Wendy Garf-Lipp, to over sixty Head Start teachers to begin the workshop. (Row two) Wendy begins the session by asking groups of teachers their ideas of what constitutes the components of a healthy snack as Head Start Nutrition Director Gloria Jackson and Partners' School Wellness Coordinator Marcia Picard listen. (Row three) Groups of teachers work in small groups to come up with a list of healthy snack components. (Row four) As groups sample some of the recommended items, Wendy show some of the poorer choices, like a small bag of applesauce that contains five teaspoons of added sugar and  Chobani mixed berry Greek yogurt. that contains 16 grams of sugar, as much sugar as a preschooler should get in an entire day. (Row five) Wendy describes some better alternatives, such as small packs of nuts, cheese, olives, hummus, and a simple recipe she made with canned chick peas before Marcia Picard and Dr. Weed end with recommendations for lowering dietary sugar and increasing healthy fats in children's diets, including whole milk. (Bottom row) The group concludes by making a list of healthier alternative snacks which they discuss with Wendy and Marcia before they leave. 

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